Nathan Price, Institute for Systems Biology, “The 100K Wellness Project: A Data-Rich Longitudinal Study for the Digital Age”

When:
May 3, 2016 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
2016-05-03T11:00:00-04:00
2016-05-03T12:00:00-04:00
Where:
Clark Hall 110, VTC to Talbot Library, Traylor 709
Johns Hopkins University Eastern Campus
1101 E 33rd St, Baltimore, MD 21218
USA

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Bio

“The 100K Wellness Project: A Data-Rich Longitudinal Study for the Digital Age”

price-150x150Dr. Nathan Price is Professor & Associate Director of the Institute for Systems Biology (ISB) in Seattle.  He is a Co-Founder and on the Board of Directors of Arivale, a scientific wellness company he started with Lee Hood out of the 100K Wellness Project. He has won numerous awards for his scientific work, including a Howard Temin Pathway to Independence Award from NIH, an NSF CAREER award, a young investigator award from the Roy J. Carver Charitable Trust, and he was named as one of the inaugural “Tomorrow’s PIs” by Genome Technology and as a Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar.   Dr. Price also serves on editorial boards for many leading scientific journals including Science Translational Medicine and Cell Systems.

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Abstract

The 100K Wellness Project: A Data-Rich Longitudinal Study for the Digital Age

22Healthcare is becoming more proactive and data-rich than anything before possible – and will increasingly focus on maintaining and enhancing wellness more than just reacting to disease. Lee Hood and I have recently launched a large-scale 100K wellness project that integrates genomics, proteomics, transcriptomics, microbiomes, clinical chemistries and wearable devices of the quantified self to monitor wellness and disease. I present results from our proof-of-concept pilot study in a set of 108 individuals (the Pioneer 100 study) over the past year, showing how the interpretation of this data led to actionable findings for individuals to improve health and reduce risk drivers of disease.

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