Calendar

Sep
29
Fri
2017
2017 Johns Hopkins Statistical Symposium
Sep 29 @ 7:30 am – 3:00 pm

Faculty, staff, residents, fellows, students, and statisticians of all levels and interests are invited to attend the inaugural Johns Hopkins Statistical Symposium, a joint educational effort sponsored by the School of Medicine Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine and the School of Public Health Department of Biostatistics. The Symposium will take place on Friday, September 29, 2017 from 7:30 AM – 3:00 PM at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, Chevy Chase Auditorium, Zayed 2119A, Baltimore, MD 21287.

Please come join us for this exciting event! The day will consist of speakers from the Cleveland Clinic, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, and Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Students, trainees, clinical and translational faculty and researchers, and statisticians of all levels are welcome to attend.

To register for the 2017 Statistical Symposium, please fill out the registration form.

Oct
3
Tue
2017
Nathan Crone MD, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, “Studies of Brain and Behavior in Epilepsy”
Oct 3 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

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Bio

“Studies of Brain and Behavior in Epilepsy”

 

Dr. Nathan Crone is a neurologist at Johns Hopkins with expertise in epileptology, clinical neurophysiology, and cognitive neurology.  Dr. Crone’s research program uses computational analysis of intracranial EEG recordings for studies in functional mapping, cognitive neuroscience, and brain-machine interfacing.  Dr. Crone’s lab has developed advanced methods for online and offline functional mapping cortical networks responsible for motor, speech and language function, and for real-time mapping and decoding of the human cortical networks controlling upper limb movements and speech.  This research has supported a variety of multi-disciplinary scientific collaborations across departments, campuses, and institutions.  More recently, Dr. Crone has contributed to the development of an app for the Apple Watch that detects seizures.

Click here to view webcast.

Abstract

“Studies of Brain and Behavior in Epilepsy”

 

Recent advances in the management of epilepsy highlight the importance of continuing innovations in computational medicine. For example, computational advances in the analysis of EEG signals have allowed clinicians to map the brain networks responsible for both normal and abnormal (seizure) behavior with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution.  These tools can visualize the human brain at work as its different functional-anatomic components are recruited in real time during different behaviors.  Moreover, functional interactions between different brain areas can be studied to understand how individual brain regions contribute to the overall activity and function of brain networks.  Meanwhile, advances in consumer mobile electronics, including wearable computing devices such as the Apple Watch, have the potential to transform the management of epilepsy by providing automatic seizure detection and alerting, data driven healthcare analytics, and tools that empower patients to take a more active role in their own management.

 

References

Lachaux JP, Axmacher N, Mormann F, Halgren E, Crone NE. High-frequency neural activity and human cognition: Past, present and possible future of intracranial EEG research. Progress in Neurobiology, 2012.

http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/epiwatch/

 

Click here to view webcast.

Oct
4
Wed
2017
Van Wedeen MD, Harvard Medical School, “Uncovering the Physical and Mathematical Principles of the Heart and the Brain With Diffusion MRI”
Oct 4 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

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Bio

“Uncovering the Physical and Mathematical Principles of the Heart and the Brain With Diffusion MRI “

Van Wedeen is an Associate Professor of Radiology at the Harvard Medical School and the first Thomas J. Brady Endowed Chair in Radiology. Raised in New York City, Dr. Wedeen attended Harvard College with a Westinghouse Scholarship, concentrating in math, earned his MD at Albert Einstein, a residency in internal medicine at Columbia, and then joined Harvard-MGH in 1983 as one of their first fellows in NMR imaging. His work on imaging of motion and flow with tagging and phase contrast led in 1985 to the first MRA, published in Science1, and later, to the first tensor MRI, of cardiac strain, in 1989, and the imaging of myocardial fiber architecture and fiber function2. Building on this approach, Dr Wedeen’s lab for the past 20 years has focused on the mapping brain architecture and connectivity, among their firsts, they presented MRI tractography3 in 1995, developed high angular resolution diffusion MRI4 in 1999-2000, and innovations including DENSE, SMS, and balanced gradients. This program laid foundations for the Connectome Scanner and the Human Connectome Project5, in which Dr. Wedeen was a PI. Recently, this research, using a new analysis of diffusion MRI of the brain, has led Dr. Wedeen’s lab to a new hypothesis about brain architecture. Cerebral axons, they suggest, follow three axes of smooth Cartesian coordinate systems by means of parallel curved sheets – basic mathematical structures called foliations6. If correct, this architecture could provide coordination and authentication of brain structure and connectivity on microscopic and macroscopic scales, leading to new tools of for brain imaging, and potentially clues to brain function, particularly that of the human telencephalon. A focus of Dr. Wedeen’s current research is to further investigate this conjecture, its accuracy and implications, in collaborations of imaging, physics and neuroscience. Holding several patents, Dr. Wedeen is a Fellow of the International Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine and Director of Connectomics at the Martinos Imaging Center. Eight of Dr. Wedeen’s students have become professors in radiology and three department chairs.

 

Click here to view webcast.

Abstract

“Uncovering the Physical and Mathematical Principles of the Heart and the Brain With Diffusion MRI ”

 

This year, 2017, honors the centenary of D’Arcy Thompson’s “On Growth and Form”. In it he inaugurates a program to understand living systems using the ideas that revolutionized physics: symmetry and conservation, non-Euclidean geometry, and anticipates broken symmetry, scaling, and emergence, and presumably other ideas yet to be recognized. In this talk, we discuss geometric symmetries in heart and the brain that had been gleaned only with difficulty or in part by classical methods, but which the new methods of diffusion MRI can uncover or make clear.

As an example of symmetry in biological structure, consider the eye and its sphericity. The early development of the eye yields a shape that is fairly round, but the finishing touches are provided by the movement of the eye in its socket, a dynamical system whose function drives structure to greater symmetry. In the heart, morphogenetic programs guide the ventricle to become a cylinder of helical fibers. However, once established, architecture is refined by dynamics. Whereas myocardial deformations vary by 2-3x across the thickness of the wall, cardiocytes converge upon an orientation field given by a toroidal helix, resembling the famed Hopf fibration of SU(2), uniquely to afford almost constant fiber shortenings, of 13±2%. Thus in the heart, universal structure emerges from dynamics.

Recently, fiber architecture of the brain has been noted to show a striking symmetry. Centralized nervous systems arise in bilateral species, and typically have the form of orthogonal grids or ladders coherent with the body axis. The vertebrate is no exception, its nervous system being patterned as an axial checkerboard of regions and connections. Diffusion MRI now suggests this pattern is expressed more extensively and precisely than previously suspected, by an ingenious mechanism. Fiber orientations adhere to coordinate systems by as parallel sheets of crossing fibers, a structure of notable symmetry, called a foliation. We discuss major predictions of this model, and some possible implications for brain mapping and for theories of function. Because we can measure this architecture with dMRI, we may ask how it is distributed among brain systems, and in this way, possibly gain insight into brain function.

 

 

 

Click here to view webcast.

Nov
6
Mon
2017
Information Session: Graduate Studies in CM
Nov 6 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm

Graduate Studies in CM Information Session

 

Join an online information session and take part in a discussion with faculty and current graduate students about the program, our areas of research, admissions requirements, and life in Baltimore.

Register here.

JHU - Institute for Computational Medicine