Calendar

Nov
13
Tue
2018
Birgit Schoeberl, Novartis, “Quantitative Drug Discovery – Opportunities for Modeling and Simulation in the Age of Machine Learning”
Nov 13 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

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Bio

“Quantitative Drug Discovery – Opportunities for Modeling and Simulation in the Age of Machine Learning”

Dr. Birgit Schoeberl currently serves a Global Head of Modeling and Simulation, PK Sciences at Novartis. Before joining Novartis, Birgit served as interim Senior Vice President, Scientific Value, at GNS Healthcare. During her time at GNS, she focused on applying causal machine learning to drug development. Prior to GNS, she was a member of the founding team at Merrimack Pharmaceuticals and where she spent over 12 years in different roles. In her latest role as Head of Discovery and Early Development, she gained broad experience in oncology drug discovery and development. Birgit and her leadership team were responsible for multiple preclinical and early clinical programs.

Birgit received her Chemical Engineering degree from the Technical University in Karlsruhe, Germany, and her Ph.D. in Biological Engineering from the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems in Magdeburg. She was a post-doctoral fellow in the laboratories of Douglas Lauffenburger and Peter Sorger in the Biological Engineering Department at MIT.

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Abstract

“Quantitative Drug Discovery – Opportunities for Modeling and Simulation in the Age of Machine Learning”

In my talk, I will discuss how different modeling approaches from machine learning to mechanistic computational models are applied throughout the drug discovery process. We discuss a proliferation screen across 58 cell lines stimulated with multiple ligands. At this example, we explore the potential to combine machine learning and mechanistic computational models. We show that the predictive model performance increases  when  simulated features derived from the mechanistic model are included as features into a Bagged Decision Tree (BDTs) model. The presented novel approach of using BDTs in conjunction with simulated signaling features is the beginning of how complex mechanistic models and large data sets can be combined to understand cellular complexity.

 

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Nov
15
Thu
2018
Rising Stars: Women 2018 Workshop
Nov 15 – Nov 16 all-day

This Rising Stars in Biomedical career development workshop aims to bring together top female postdocs and senior graduate students whose research focuses on biomedical applications. The program includes technical talks, panels and discussions with faculty, researchers from Baltimore and Boston area clinical labs and industry. The goal is to provide mentoring and support for top junior researchers as they transition to the next phase of their career, and to enable them to form connections with their cohort of investigators in different areas of biomedical research.

Participants and Presentation Abstracts

Agenda

November 14

7:00–8:30pm Welcome Reception: Cocktails and Hors D’oeuvres

Alizee Bistro

November 15

8:30–9:00 am Continental Breakfast
9:00–9:15 Welcome Remarks

Sridevi Sarma, Assoc. Prof. of Biomedical Engineering, JHU

9:15–10:30 Impact Session I 

Archana Venkataraman, John C. Malone Asst. Prof. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, JHU

Nicholas Durr, Asst. Prof. of Biomedical Engineering, JHU

Rachel Karchin, Prof. of Biomedical Engineering, JHU

Ryan Roemmich , Asst. Prof. Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, JHU SOM

Rene Vidal, Herschel L. Seder Prof. of Biomedical Engineering, JHU

Raimond L. Winslow, Raj and Neera Singh Prof. of Biomedical Engineering, JHU

Sridevi Sarma, Assoc. Prof. of Biomedical Engineering, JHU

Polina Golland, Prof. of Elec. Engineering and Computer Science, MIT

Deborah Burstein Mattingly, Assoc. Prof. of Radiology, Health Sciences and Technology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard University

Martha Gray, J. W. Kieckhefer Prof. of Health Sciences & Technology, MIT

Roger Tung, Scientific Founder, President, and CEO, Concert Pharmaceuticals

Natasha Hussain, Scientific Dir., Johns Hopkins Kavli Neuroscience Discovery Institute

Feilim Mac Gabhann, Assoc. Prof. of Biomedical Engineering, JHU

.10:30–10:45 Coffee break
10:45–12:00 Impact Session I (continued)
12:00–1:00 Lunch
1:00–2:45 Impact Session II
2:45–3:00 Break
3:00–4:00 Impact Session II (continued)
4:00–4:15 Break
4:15–5:15 “How to Get a Job” – Polina Golland, Prof. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT
5:15–5:45 Senior Career Panel

Raimond L. Winslow, Raj and Neera Singh Prof. of Biomedical Engineering, JHU

Marion J. Ball, Sr. Advisor, Healthcare Informatics, Center for Computational Health, IBM

Martha Gray, J. W. Kieckhefer Prof. of Health Sciences and Technology, MIT

Kathleen Cullen, Prof. of Biomedical Engineering, JHU

Michael I. Miller, Prof. and Director, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering

5:45–6:30 Break
6:30–9:00 Dinner at Lebanese Taverna

 

November 16

8:00–9:00 am Full Breakfast w/MIT & JHU BME Faculty
9:00–10:30 Session I: Effective Self-preservation                               

Yuval Hart, PhD

Julie Huang, PhD

HFP Consulting

10:30–10:45 Break
10:45–12:30 Session II: Mastering Interviewing

Yuval Hart, PhD

Julie Huang, PhD

HFP Consulting

12:30–2:00 Lunch
2:00–2:45 Junior Career Panel

Jamie Spangler, Asst. Prof. of Biomedical Engineering, JHU

Nicholas Durr, Asst. Prof. of Biomedical Engineering, JHU

Muyinatu Bell, Asst. Prof. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, JHU

Archana Venkataraman, John C. Malone Asst. Prof. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, JHU

Joshua Vogelstein, Asst. Prof. of Biomedical engineering, JHU

Heather Benz, Medical Device Fellow, Center for Devices and Radiological Heath, FDA

Natasha Hussain, Scientific Director, Kavli Neuroscience Discovery Institute, JHU

2:45–3:00 Break
3:00–4:00 Closing Social

Archana Venkataraman, John C. Malone Asst. Prof. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, JHU

 

 

Computational Medicine MSE Program Online Information Session
Nov 15 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The Johns Hopkins University Institute for Computational Medicine is seeking highly qualified applicants for its full-time master’s degree programs.

Please join us to learn more! Register here.

At this event, you will:

  • Learn about the Computational Medicine focus area within the Biomedical Engineering Master of Science in Engineering
  • Gain insight into our program and admission requirements.
  • Hear about faculty research related to computational anatomy, computational molecular medicine, computational physiological medicine, and computational healthcare.
  • Hear from students and gain insight into what life is like as a Johns Hopkins engineering student.
  • Have your questions answered by Computational Medicine faculty and students.

As valued members of the Institute for Computational Medicine, our graduate students work alongside our world-renowned faculty members who are performing cross-disciplinary research and developing solutions that address the critical challenges pertaining to the diagnosis and treatment of human disease through applications of mathematics, engineering and computational science.

Dec
4
Tue
2018
Ra’id Awadallah, JHU Applied Physics Laboratory, “Sub-Wavelength Microwave Focusing for Neural Ablation”
Dec 4 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

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Bio

“Sub-Wavelength Microwave Focusing for Neural Ablation”

Dr. Ra’id Awadallah received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Virginia Tech in 1998. He joined JHU/APL in the same year where he is currently a section supervisor, project manager and a member of the principal professional staff.  Over the last 20 years, he has led a team of researchers developing efficient numerical models for tropospheric propagation, electromagnetic scattering from randomly rough surfaces, radar cross-section of complex targets, pulsed propagation in complex urban structures, and modeling and simulation of thin-film metamaterials. He has authored over 20 papers in these areas. Dr Awadallah is a member of the IEEE and Commission F of URSI.

 

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Abstract

“Sub-Wavelength Microwave Focusing for Neural Ablation”

Timothy Sleasman, Andrew Strikwerda, and Ra’id Awadallah
The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

Whatever we’re looking at, be it streaming video at home or medical imaging in the office, we always want the highest resolution possible. Traditional imaging techniques that use lenses, like telescopes and cameras, are “far-field” imaging systems. The resolution of far-field electromagnetic imaging systems, which utilize the radiative portion of the sources’ fields, is ultimately constrained by the diffraction limit.  This limit is attributed to the fact that the imaging aperture only captures portions of the radiative spatial spectrum of the source field and ignores the evanescent (non-radiative) portion of the spectrum.  Due to this fact, sub-wavelength imaging resolution is only achievable if the near-field portion of the source field spectrum can be utilized. One promising pathway to access the near-fields is to place the imaging system at near field distances, but even then designing the imaging system has several practical challenges.

In this talk, initial designs for achieving deeply sub-wavelength focusing of a microwave beam will be discussed.  The first design is based on near-field plates (NFPs), which are non-periodically patterned surfaces capable of forming beams with sub-wavelength focus in the near-field.  The spatially-varying impedance distribution of the NFP needed to focus the microwave beam is derived by formulating and numerically solving an integral equation.  The second design which is based on linearly and circularly-corrugated near-field plates will be presented next.  The near-field interaction of the waveguide field with the properly-designed groove impedance distribution results in the desired focusing of the microwave energy.  This architecture can ultimately be used to form prescribed field patterns inside inhomogeneous media, providing applications in neural ablation and biomedical imaging.

 

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JHU - Institute for Computational Medicine